Weekends are a time for relaxation and exploration. 

On Saturday, the Innovators had some free time to themselves. Many chose to explore the different neighborhoods of Boston, an epicenter of both cultural and scientific innovation.

Angela, Lizbeth, and a few others went to visit the Harvard Art Museums, and spent three hours in the famous Fogg Museum, home to works by Picasso, Monet, Renoir, and others. Afterwards, they explored Cambridge, a bustling college town with plenty of shopping and restaurants. A few others explored the Prudential Area, also widely-known for its shopping and not too far from the Berklee Conservatory of Music, a famous music school. Still others walked around the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, one of the premier scientific institutions of learning.

The Innovators pose in front of the kayaks, ready for an exciting hour on the river!

The Innovators pose in front of the kayaks, ready for an exciting hour on the river!

Look at those views!

Look at those views!

On Sunday, some of the Innovators chose to partake in scheduled activities with the camp. Two groups went kayaking on the Charles River, partnering up in double boats. The location and positioning allowed the Innovators to catch breathtaking views not only of the city of Boston, but also of the city of Cambridge, and a group of sailboats out to enjoy the sunny day. The proximity to the water also offered a cool breeze—a nice respite from the summer heat!

The Innovators gather around the leader of the Freedom Trail tour, dressed as Phyllis Wheatley, a prominent African-American poet

The Innovators gather around the leader of the Freedom Trail tour, dressed as Phyllis Wheatley, a prominent African-American poet

Then, in the evening, after a lunch break, some Innovators partook in the Freedom Trail, a historical tour in downtown Boston. The tour guide, dressed as Phyllis Wheatley, a famous African-American poet and former slave, gave expert stories on not only famous spots in the area, but also on famous historical figures who once lived in Boston. The Innovators visited places such as the site of the Boston Massacre, the Old City Hall, and the place where Paul Revere, Samuel Adams, John Hancock, and other founding fathers are buried. 

At dinnertime, the Innovators went out for dinner at a typical burger joint and walked around the area just in time to catch the sunset. Boston isn’t just a city for learning and education—it’s a city for adventures, too.

Emerson Monks